Rolling Stones Fans Will Feel “Secure” In Buying The Rolling Stones’ Latest Live Recording

July 5, 2018 by: Shauna O'Donnell

Courtesy: Eagle Rock Entertainment

By Philip Sayblack

Eagle Rock Entertainment has pulled another classic archived Rolling Stones concert from the vaults.  This latest live recording from what is one of the music industry’s greatest acts (not just one of rock’s greatest names) –  From The VaultNo Security – San Jose 99 is another enjoyable jaunt back into the 1990s, but much later than the band’s last recording from the 90s, Live at the Tokyo Dome 1990.  That recording was released October 30, 2015.  This time, Eagle Rock is taking audiences back to the band’s 1999 performance in San Jose, California, the city that originally hosted the band way back in 1965.  The recording’s 20-song set, which is split between a DVD and CD (and on separate platform Blu-ray and CD), sets the recording’s foundation.  It will be discussed shortly.  The band’s performance of that set list is just as important as the set list itself, and will, in turn, be discussed a little bit later.  The recording’s production values round out its most important elements.  Each element is key in its own way to the whole of the recording.  All things considered, the noted elements make From The VaultNo Security – No Security99 yet another must have live recording for any and every Rolling Stones fan.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s latest entry in its ongoing Rolling Stones From The Vault series is another impressive offering that any Rolling Stones devotee will feel “secure” adding to his or her music library.  Yes, that awful pun was fully intended.  It proves to be such a strong effort in part through its set list.  This extensive 20-song set list is split between the recording’s CD and its DVD/BD (depending on which platform one purchases).  The set list stands out because it doesn’t just play it safe and offer all of the same songs that have been presented in each of the band’s previous entries in the From The Vault series.  Rather, it goes off the proverbial beaten path this time and offers performances of some far lesser performed tunes including the title track from the band’s 1978 album Some Girls, the band’s take on songwriter Bobby Troup’s timeless song ‘Route 66,’ which was included in the Stones’ self-titled 1964 album, ‘Get Off My Cloud,’ which is taken from the band’s 1965 album December’s Children and so many other rarities.  Yes, there are some familiar tunes included in this set list such as ‘Paint It Black,’ ‘Honky Tonk Woman,’ ‘Midnight Rambler’ and of course ‘Sympathy for the Devil,’ but by and large, this time the concert’s set list gives listeners a certain amount of variety in comparison to the set lists of the band’s previous live recordings.  It’s a nice change of pace this time out.  On top of that, the very fact that the band’s original performance presented here was split between two days, odds are that the split presented here between the recording’s CD and DVD/BD sides likely mirrors that two-day run that the band had in San Jose.  That adds even more reason to appreciate this set list and its division.  Keeping this in mind, the set list presented here creates a strong foundation for the recording, and is certainly not the only item that makes the recording worth experiencing. The band’s performance of the set list is just as important to this recording’s presentation as its set list.

The performance put on by Mick Jagger and company in this latest archived recording from The Rolling Stones will keep audiences just as engaged as the set list itself.  This is exemplified at least in part in the band’s performance of ‘Saint of Me,’  This performance features not only Jagger and company, but all of the familiar backing musicians, too right down to the backing vocalists.  What’s really great in the group’s collective performance here is that no one really has to do much other than just play the song to so effectively keep audiences entertained and engaged.  The energy in Jagger’s vocal delivery, both as he stands before the audience, playing his guitar and as he makes his way across the stage, delivers such energy in itself.  Meanwhile the backing vocalists add their own power to the performance as they sway and sing.  Even Jagger’s band mates, Ron Wood and Keith Richards don’t have to do much to make their performances enjoyable as they make their way through the song.  The same can be said of drummer Charlie Watts as he keeps time through it all.  It’s amazing to see someone of his age (at that time) still able to do what he does with so much energy.  It’s a testament, perhaps, to just good, clean living.  What’s more, the fact that the song was the seventh of the set’s 20 total songs, yet the band still had so much in them collectively, says plenty in itself.  One of the most interesting moments of the band’s performance comes early on – just before the band launches into ‘You Got Me Rocking’ – as Jagger apologizes to the audiences for what he called “a change of plans.”  He notes something about something happening to him at some point.  It seems to hint that maybe the concert was split into two nights because something happened to him physically in the first night, leading to a cancellation and re-scheduling for a second night.  Again, it’s such a brief moment, but does a lot to explain why the concert is spread across two nights.  Even more notable is Jagger’s sincerity in his apology to the audience.  One can tell that he really appreciated the audience coming back for a second night with the band.  It shows a real appreciation for the fans, and is just one more way in which the performance stands out here, even as brief as it is.  The band’s performance of the decidedly reserved ‘I Got The Blues’ is another wonderful example of the importance of the band’s performance overall in this recording.  Considering all of the energy that is exuded throughout the course of the concert, this rare moment is a huge departure for the band.  The whole band (including the backing musicians) fully embraces the song’s emotion from start to end.  Jagger’s vocal delivery is a clear example of that embrace.  There is such a pained sound in his delivery as he sings, and the depth of emotion in the song’s instrumental portion on every part, adds its own depth with all of the crescendos, decrescendos and dynamics in general.  It makes this song another of the concert’s most standout moments and key moments that shows the importance of the band’s performance of the show’s set list.  When these moments are taken into consideration along with the rest of the performance – including especially the powerhouse performance of ‘Paint It Black’ — the whole of the performance makes the concert just as fun to take in at home as it must have been at its original recording.  When this is considered along with the show’s set list the whole of those two elements does more than enough to make this recording a welcome addition to any Rolling Stones fan’s home music and video library.  It still is not the last of the recording’s most important elements to discuss.  The concert’s production values round out its most important elements.

In considering the fact that the concert presented in San Jose ’99 was recorded in 1999, right at the turn of the century, the major advancements in recording technology that are available today were not available at that time, including high-definition and 4K.  Despite that, the audio and video mix exhibited here are surprisingly positive.  The video isn’t the crystal clear of so many of today’s concerts, but it still is clear enough in its own right.  The sound meanwhile is just as impressive as is in any live recording that has been released since.  The vocals and music are expertly balanced throughout the show.  As has been noted so many times before, this is key because – believe it or not – it has and does happen where concert audio has been anything but expertly mixed.  Luckily such instance has always been extremely rare for Eagle Rock Entertainment live recordings.  This recording is no exception to that rule either.  Simply put, the audio and video mix are top-notch again, giving audiences an experience that is just as enjoyable at home as it was in its original presentation, if not better.  In other words, it gives audiences the best seat in the house and then some.  That is especially the case when this element is considered along with the recording’s set list and the band’s performance thereof.  It makes both elements that much more worth experiencing.  That being the case, the recording in whole proves to be a recording that is not only a great Rolling Stones live experience, but one that every Rolling Stones fan will want to own.

Eagle Rock Entertainment’s latest addition to its Rolling Stones From The Vaultseries, No Security — San Jose ’99 is a welcome addition to any Rolling Stones fan’s home music and video library.  That is due in no small part to a set list that stands out distinctly from the set lists in the series’ previous entries.  While there are some familiar tunes included here, the roughly two-hour, 20-song set list is made up largely of songs not presented in the series’ previous offerings.  The band’s performance of that set list is everything that audiences have come to expect of Mick Jagger and company.  Much the same can be said of the recording’s production values.  Once again, the production values give home viewers the best seat in the house.  Each element is critical in its own right to the whole of this recording.  All things considered, they make No Security— San Jose ’99 one of this year’s top new live recordings, one of the year’s top new live CDs and live DVDs/BDs.  It will be available next Friday, July 13.  It can be pre-ordered on DVD/CDBlu-ray/CD3LP and digital video now.

More information on From The VaultNo Security – San Jose 99 is available online along with all of The Rolling Stones’ latest news and more at:

Websitehttp://www.rollingstones.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/therollingstones

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/RollingStones

More information on this and other titles from Eagle Rock Entertainment is available online now at:

Websitehttp://www.eagle-rock.com

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/EagleRockEnt

Twitterhttp://twitter.com/EagleRockNews

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